Noah

A Dog-Face Veteran’s Thoughts

I’ve bled, sweated, and shed tears in the defense of this country. I’m humbled and honored to do so. I do it for the country, but mainly I do what I do for my brothers and sisters who share in these sacrifices.

The American people do a tremendous job honoring us veterans. Thank you. But I simply don’t understand why our four-legged Veterans aren’t honored side by side with the two-legged variety.

From the Minuteman of the Revolution to the Marines in Helmand Province, Afghanistan today, young Americans have heeded this country’s call. Since World War II, dogs have also answered this call of service to the nation.

These living, breathing creatures risk their lives for the same reason the American service member does–for one another.  If you have ever walked a combat patrol you know that you breathed a sigh of relief seeing that furry four-legged explosive finding machine was out in front of your patrol.   

Military Working Dogs are on the front lines in the fight against tyranny. They are fighting and dying for our country.  Dogs are outperforming million dollar pieces of equipment on the battlefield. They are finding improvised explosives with their noses and instincts. They are saving our service members’ lives. I’m asking you to join me in recognizing them.  Because of their sacrifice, your loved one may be here today.

So, please thank your two-legged Veterans. And, if you have the opportunity, also thank your four-legged Veterans too.

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15 thoughts on “A Dog-Face Veteran’s Thoughts

    1. Kevin Hanrahan Post author

      Thanks so much Bobby! These dogs are on the front lines every day and deserve recognition for their commitment and sacrifice. I’ve got a lot more planned so stay tuned!

      Reply
      1. Dora

        I totally agree. Animals in general add so much to our lives but service dogs are the cutting edge for our Military. They have save many lives with their cunning instincts. We should honor them for their service and give thanks for their contributions.

        Reply
  1. Stefan Chevaux

    I havent heard the term “Dogface” since my Father passed
    he was a 2 war veteran 23yrs service, My Brother is a 2 tour Viet-Nam Veteran,I didnt see combat. Bless you Brother for these posts!!

    Reply
    1. Kevin Hanrahan Post author

      Thank you Stefan. I thought that was a funny play with words on one of my focuses! I used to watch old war movies with my dad when I was a kid.
      Your families’ lineage of military service is wonderful and honorable. My dad also served….32 years in the National Guard. They are all my heroes.

      Reply
  2. Dawn Torrens

    Kevin, once again you’er powerful words hit home to us all just what is involved for you and these amazing beautiful dogs. My heart is pulled tightly when I read your compelling posts. I totally agree that these amazing four legged beauties should be honoured in the same way as there two legged counterparts! As you know I am an avid supporter of our men in Afghanistan here in England and stateside, I lost a good friend to the war over there just 3 years ago. I think what you are doing here bringing awareness to the people is inspiring and just incredible.Well done :) @torrenstp

    Reply
    1. Kevin Hanrahan Post author

      Thanks so much Dawn. One of my goals is to raise awareness so we can get these four legged Warriors the recognition that they so very much deserve!

      Reply
  3. suzan kundrat

    Thank you for your service ! I wrote a comment about my Army Ranger son and my program at the local jail but it didn’t send somehow. Most importantly, I am forwarding your info to friends …. Look forward to your blog.

    Reply
    1. Kevin Hanrahan Post author

      Hi Suzan. Thanks so much for your comments and kind words! Is your son stationed in Georgia?

      Reply
      1. suzan kundrat

        Yes, he was in Savannah for years – now in Columbus GA – He, like you, has been on many missions over the duration of this conflict and received the Silver Star last summer. (He would not want me mentioning it – but, as his mom, I do). I am a writer also and have been keeping stories about my program Paws and Stripes. It is a resocialization program for unadoptable dogs at our jail here ( brevardcountysheriff.org) that has grown in five years to inspire jails throught the country to implement it’s success – over 200 saved furry guardians. Prisons have done it before, but not in the short term unstable time stay environment of jail. I am passing this info to a retired Marine- ret.Sheriff corp.dog trainer that has a kennel in Conn. Fred Abbey. Surprised by your response – so many write. Home of Free because of the Brave !

        Reply
        1. Kevin Hanrahan Post author

          You so should mention that Suzan…….that is a tremendous award and you should be very proud on your son!

          Your program sounds fabulous! What exactly are the dogs in the program trained for and for whom? I’ve see a few programs were prisoners learn dog training skills and train dogs for veterans…..such a fabulous idea!

          Reply
  4. Martin Lewis

    Like to here of the good work that you, your comrades and faithful hounds are doing over there. But bad news in the papers this week in the UK, that explosives that don’t have a significant scent are now being developed and deployed in some Countries.

    Difficult enough training dogs, but have the Us ever had any connection with the trained African Bees that are able o find old mines and mine fields, not sure if they are reacting to the explosives or plastic mine casings. Large African/Asian rats have also been trained to sniff out mines.

    Reply

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