Category Archives: Photos

PPirro

Military Dogs – For Loan!

Back in November I posted a terrific piece, The Puppy Program, about the Department of Defense (DoD) Breeding Program located at Lackland Airbase.

I promised you a second part, so today ladies and gentlemen here it is!

Since I was delayed getting this next piece out,  I’m going share a special something with you all. I am going to share with you how you can become an active contributor to the Breeding Progam.

Yes, you can help raise these future 4 legged heroes.

Puppy MMyrna

Puppy MMyrna

Eight weeks after the birth the puppies, they  go home with qualified and dedicated ‘foster’ volunteers from the greater San Antonio/Austin area. During the ‘foster’ period, the pups are raised in secure, nurturing homes that provide learning and play opportunities, as well as outings for the puppies to be exposed to different environments and people to develop a socially sound puppy. At seven months of age the puppy is returned to Lackland Air Force Base (AFB) to begin the next stage of its life – Puppy Training.

This training will ultimately determine if the puppy possesses the attributes to make a working dog, and if so, will prepare the pup to enter the next phase of its training at the Dog Training School. The Dog Training School is the ‘basic training’ course for most Military Working Dogs. All supplies, food, medicine, and veterinary care needed for the puppies are provided by DoD? What is DoD?.

The Breeding Program is always looking for interested persons to open their homes to foster a future Military Working Dog. If you think you have what it takes and would like to be a part of raising a future four-legged troop the Foster Consultants at Lackland AFB would love to hear from you! This great organization can be reached at telephone number : 210-671-3686 or through email: 341TRSPP@us.af.mil

Puppy OOlaf

Puppy OOlaf

Requirements necessary for participating as a foster volunteer: you must live within a two-hour driving distance of Lackland AFB, TX, have a fenced yard and no more than three personal dogs. **While these are just some of the requirements, they are not all-inclusive.

Please contact the Foster Consultants at 210-671-3686 or 341TRSPP@us.af.mil to obtain more information.

So folks, if you live in the San Antonio area and want to foster a future furry hero? Please call today! I wish I lived in that area!

The DoD Military Working Dog Breeding Program has it’s very own Facebook Page. So if you love to look at these adorable future heroes, head on over to their page and like it!

Oomaha at 20 weeks.

OOmaha at 20 weeks.

Note: This information and photos are being published with permission from Bernie at the Department of Defense Breeding Program. This is Part I of the Puppy Program Feature.

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Tracer, Trooper & Trigger ... Handler Sgt J White, CD

Military Dog Picture of the Week/ Breaking Iraq

I happened upon the photo above on Twitter from a kind Canadien chap. This is an absolute heart melting photo!

Thanks for sharing Dave……..his caption was, ”Tracer, Trooper & Trigger … Handler Sergeant J. White, CD”

I simply loved it and had to share!

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Completely changing gears here, I wanted to let you all know about a new book coming out that I’m very interested in reading entitled, Breaking Iraq – The Ten Mistakes That Broke Iraq.

The book will be released on March 19, the 10th Anniversary of the war in Iraq and was written by Colonel (Retired) Ted Spain and Terry D. Turchie, a former Deputy Assistant Director of the Counterterrorism Division of the FBI.

U.S. Soldiers assigned to Bravo Company, 2nd Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment provide security as their military working dog drinks water after climbing a ridge in the Spin Boldak district, Kandahar province, Afghanistan, March 3, 2013. The unit assisted Afg

U.S. Soldiers assigned to Bravo Company, 2nd Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment provide security as their military working dog drinks water after climbing a ridge in the Spin Boldak district, Kandahar province, Afghanistan, March 3, 2013. The unit assisted Afg

Colonel Spain commanded the 18th Military Police Brigade during the ground war and subsequent occupation of Iraq. I served in this brigade with Colonel Spain. He is a great man and leader.

I’ve got a quick and funny story to tell you. In 2003, I flew to Kuwait wearing civilian clothes in business class to fight in this war. These business class tickets were the only ones the government could get us flying into Kuwait at this time. It wasn’t how I envisioned going to war!

I was part of the 709th Military Police Battalion’s small advance party into Kuwait prior to the ground war. Colonel Spain was one of the personnel that met us at the airport and escorted us to the isolated Camp Virginia in the dessert of Kuwait where we prepared for war.

Man I could tell you some great stories about these times…… spending a month in the sand storms of Kuwait or the actual invasion of Iraq.

But back to my point- I need to read Breaking Iraq – The Ten Mistakes That Broke Iraq.

Why?

Lance Cpl. Thomas Foster takes a rest with his military working dog Diamond during a patrol through Boldak, Afghanistan March 6. Foster is a member of Weapons Company, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment. (Photo by Sgt. Bobby J. Yarbrough)

Lance Cpl. Thomas Foster takes a rest with his military working dog Diamond during a patrol through Boldak, Afghanistan March 6. Foster is a member of Weapons Company, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment. (Photo by Sgt. Bobby J. Yarbrough)

There were so many things, as a young Captain, that I didn’t understand during Operation Iraqi Freedom I?  I need answers.

I also need to know why Baghdad was essentially a lawless city and the Iraqi Police dysfunctional and ineffective when I showed up with my company for Operation Iraqi Freedom II.

The forward to Breaking Iraq – The Ten Mistakes That Broke Iraq was written by Tom Ricks and in the book Colonel Spain reveals his personal involvement in the pre-war planning, the invasion, and the first year of the occupation.

This is a very short narrative of the ten mistakes:

1.Secretary Rumsfeld’s deployment plans did not include an adequate number of military police to control the routes during the ground war, nor sufficient military police to help control the streets after the ground war. This contributed to the Jessica Lynch fiasco and the chaos on the streets of Baghdad.

2. Law and Order was not given sufficient attention in the pre-war planning. This failed to provide a police system to provide security to the Iraqi citizenry and to instill a sense of trust in our Army.

3. The categories of the thousands of detainees were never clear, causing confusion as to the proper legal treatment. Were they enemy, terrorist, or criminal? What’s the difference?

4. The process of collecting intelligence from the detainees was flawed from the pre-war planning sessions, during the ground war, and during the subsequent occupation. This set the stage for abuse, including the Abu Ghraib Prison scandal.

5. Brigadier General Janis Karpinski, the warden of Abu Ghraib Prison, was the wrong leader at the wrong place at the wrong time. Her appointment resulted in scandal and loss of trust in American forces by Iraqi citizenry.

Spc. Hugo, explosive detection dog with the Tactical Explosive Detection Dog program assigned to 3rd Brigade Combat Team “Rakkasans,” 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), obeys the order to stay and watched his handler’s gestures carefully on Forward Operating Base Salerno, Afghanistan, Feb. 26, 2013. The TEDD program partners soldiers and dogs to assist in finding road side bombs in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. photo by Spc. Brian Smith-Dutton Task Force 3/101 Public Affairs)

Spc. Hugo, explosive detection dog with the Tactical Explosive Detection Dog program assigned to 3rd Brigade Combat Team “Rakkasans,” 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), obeys the order to stay and watched his handler’s gestures carefully on Forward Operating Base Salerno, Afghanistan, Feb. 26, 2013. The TEDD program partners soldiers and dogs to assist in finding road side bombs in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. photo by Spc. Brian Smith-Dutton Task Force 3/101 Public Affairs)

6. Lieutenant General Ricardo Sanchez, Commander of all military forces in Iraq during the occupation was over his head, and continued fighting the ground war, long after it was over.

7. The Coalition Provisional Authority, under the leadership of L. Paul Bremer, dismantled the Iraqi Army, and the highest level of the Ba’ath Party. We lost some of the most experienced personnel that were so vital in putting Iraq back together again.

8. Former New York City Police Commissioner Bernie Kerik was more focused on padding his resume, and getting camera time, than helping stand up a viable Iraqi Police Services.

Sgt. Misa, a military working dog with the Tactical Explosive Detection Dog program assigned to 3rd Brigade Combat Team “Rakkasans,” 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), jumps over a wall of an obstacle course during a demonstration on Forward Operating Base Salerno, Afghanistan, Feb. 26, 2013. The obstacle course is designed to test the dogs possible deployment scenarios, as well as keep them physically fit for duty. (U.S. photo by Spc. Brian Smith-Dutton Task Force 3/101 Public Affairs)

Sgt. Misa, a military working dog with the Tactical Explosive Detection Dog program assigned to 3rd Brigade Combat Team “Rakkasans,” 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), jumps over a wall of an obstacle course during a demonstration on Forward Operating Base Salerno, Afghanistan, Feb. 26, 2013. The obstacle course is designed to test the dogs possible deployment scenarios, as well as keep them physically fit for duty. (U.S. photo by Spc. Brian Smith-Dutton Task Force 3/101 Public Affairs)

9. Because standing up an Iraqi Police Service was focused on quantity, not quality, we never completely knew who we could trust.

10.President Bush’s coalition of the willing was only a coalition in name.  Even those that were willing, were not able. Only a couple of countries contributed to gaining stability in Iraq.

Colonel Spain never held any punches as my Brigade Commander and I’m sure he won’t in his book. For me, Breaking Iraq – The Ten Mistakes That Broke Iraq is a must read.

Every wonder how an Iraqi veteran felt about our withdrawal? Here are my thoughts.

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Rocky-the-cuddly-@BritishArmy-working-dog-Photographed-in-Kabul-Afghanistan-by-@JamiePeters33.png

Those Cheeky British Military Working Dogs

There was a major issue with my Monday post and I’m still trying to figure out the cause. That was the first time I’ve had any problems. It resulted in many people receiving the post multiple times and some never actually receiving the post. Please accept my apology.

A very haappy MWD!(Photo by Mike Hubbard 6 Dec 12) Used with permission

A very haappy MWD!(Photo by Mike Hubbard 6 Dec 12) Used with permission

If you didn’t receive Monday’s email you should know that the tear jerking final chapter of Marc and Anax was published on Monday. Here is the link.

If you read it already then you know that these stories aren’t scripted….they end how they end….no matter how tragic or triumphant……. these stories I share with you are unedited tales of our dog teams.

A walk through charming Helmand Province, Afghanistan(Photos by Jamie Peters, 15 Nov 12) Used with permission

A walk through charming Helmand Province, Afghanistan (Photo by Jamie Peters, 15 Nov 12) Used with permission

Last week’s fun and carefree dog photo post was taken over by my passionate “rant”, Are Military Dogs Equipment, after I spied a photo of that crazy Taliban looking dude in a photo. Of course it was the caption that set me off.

Fortunately I’m not all fired up this week so I’ve decided to post some fabulous pictures of British Military Working Dogs in Afghanistan.

Military working dogs are always handled with care! MH 27 Noc 12

Military working dogs are always handled with care! (Photo by Mike Hubbard (27 Nov 12) Used with permission

You may remember the post back in December, The British Army in Afghanistan Goes to the Dogs, where I hooked up with some British Army combat camera crew members who gracefully gave me permission to use their photos.

Once again I am using the photographer’s remarks about the photos for the captions.

the softer side of Rocky getting a drink from his handler's Camelback

The softer side of Rocky getting a drink from his handler’s Camelback. (Photo by Jamie Peters, 28 Feb 13) Used with permission.

That combat team is getting ready to depart Afghanistan and back home so I thought it was fitting to share Mike Hubbard and Jamie Peters photos one last time.

Thanks for sharing your photos with us guys and safe travels back to your families in the UK.

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U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Thomas Foster and his improvised explosives detection dog, Diamond, with Weapons Company, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment (2/7), Regimental Combat Team 7, patrol through local Afghan settlements in Montakee, Afghanistan, Feb. 10, 2013. The Marines of 2/7 utilized enablers like IDD's and secure electronic enrollment kit portable biometric device to patrol and restrict the enemy's freedom of maneuver. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Robert J. Reeves/ Released)

Are Military Dogs Equipment?

You are absolutely right if you were thinking I haven’t posted a pure picture of the week post in quite some time. 

Well this week I decided to change that and had some time at lunch yesterday so I caroused some pictures and pondered a theme for the week.

I don’t feel the need to have a theme all the time…it does make it fun sometimes though and normally if I have one they aren’t planned out…..it just comes to me… like: Cool Dog Wear Shades. 

I need to do another one of those actually….. Military Working Dogs wearing ”sunglasses” just can’t be beat! 

OK, we all know they are ballistic eye wear called Doggles (yes I said doggles) that are meant to protect our 4-legged troop’s eyes. But you have to admit….they look adorable. 

All right fine, you win. Here is a picture of everyone’s favorite 4-legged trooper, Honza Bear, with his doggles on.

Military Working Dog Honza with doggles

Military Working Dog Honza always wears his doggles for the ladies!

Anyway, back to my point. So this week I wanted to get back to the basics and make this post all about the dogs. But then I saw the picture below. 

U.S. Marines with Weapons Company, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment (2/7), Regimental Combat Team 7 patrol through local Afghan settlements and shops in Montakee, Afghanistan, Feb. 10, 2013. The Marines of 2/7 utilized equipment like improvised explosives detection dogs, interpreters, and secure electronic enrollment kits, a portable biometric device, to register and recognize the local population of Boldak, in support of International Security Assistance Forces. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Robert J. Reeves/ Released)

U.S. Marines with Weapons Company, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment (2/7), Regimental Combat Team 7 patrol through local Afghan settlements and shops in Montakee, Afghanistan, Feb. 10, 2013. The Marines of 2/7 utilized equipment like improvised explosives detection dogs, interpreters, and secure electronic enrollment kits, a portable biometric device, to register and recognize the local population of Boldak, in support of International Security Assistance Forces. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Robert J. Reeves/ Released)

No, it wasn’t the crazy Taliban looking dude that caught my attention. Look at the caption and tell me if you notice something.

Who noticed that the photographer or maybe his editor called the Improvised Explosive Detector Dog “equipment”?

I was dumbfounded and then I got fired up and started to write this post.  

Who has watched the new Animal Planet program called Glory Hounds? Admittedly I’ve only watched the first hour. After the hand grenade incident I sat there, wiped a tear from my eye, shut the TV off, and went and laid with my dogs on their bed. I needed to be close to them. 

For those that watched the show you know those handlers and dogs are Marines.  

As I’ve said from the start on this blog in one of my original blog post………. 

Dogs are no longer pets. They are family members. 

Military dogs are not equipment. They are fellow service members. U.S. Marines with Weapons Company, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment (2/7), Regimental Combat Team 7 patrol through local Afghan settlements in Montakee, Afghanistan, Feb. 10, 2013. The Marines of 2/7 utilized equipment like improvised explosives detection dogs, in support of International Security Assistance Forces. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Robert J. Reeves)

Our military, our society has evolved. Some people just need to catch up. 

Of course this issue should have been addressed with the Canine Members of the Armed Service Act, but the provision that would have recognized our military working dogs as actual members of the armed service was removed from the act. 

I’ve still not heard back from Senator McCain’s office to see if what I heard was true. So I can’t confirm or deny that Senator McCain actual sank this provision of the act.   

So my carefree and fun post full of handsome dog pictures has turned into a bit of a fiery rant. But hey, that is pretty much my MO when I’m passionate about something……but lets transition anyway….. 

I’ve got some great posts lined up in the coming weeks. The next chapter in Daniel and MWD Bony “The Grey Wolf”, a new dog team- Kevin and MWD Bull and, finally an update on Noah and that “Stubborn Puppy” MWD Chuck.

A U.S. Marine with Weapons Company, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment (2/7), Regimental Combat Team 7, speaks to Diamon, an improvised explosives detection dog (IDD), near settlements in Montakee, Afghanistan, Feb. 10, 2013. The Marines of 2/7 utilized IDDs during their patrol as a counter measure to explosive threats. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Robert J. Reeves/ Released)

A U.S. Marine with Weapons Company, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment (2/7), Regimental Combat Team 7, speaks to Diamon, an improvised explosives detection dog (IDD), near settlements in Montakee, Afghanistan, Feb. 10, 2013. The Marines of 2/7 utilized IDDs during their patrol as a counter measure to explosive threats. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Robert J. Reeves/ Released)

Yes, I also have the final chapter in Marc, MWD Anax and, MWD Dark as well as a post were I bear my soul and admit all my flaws. (this one is my wife’s favorite post so far!) 

One last thing. I went over 1,000 subscribers on the site this week. Thank you all so much. Your support inspires me to keep writing and advocating for our military dogs and troops. 

Please spread the word of my site by forwarding my posts, putting them out on your Facebook and Twitter and simply mentioning the site in passing to your friends and family members. 

The first 1,000 subscribers took me just over a year. Let’s see how fast we can get the next 1,000.

On to the next 1,000!

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Major Butch

Working Dog Videos from Afghanistan

“Major Butch,” a therapy dog with the 219th Medical Detachment (Combat Operational Stress Control) concludes her tour interacting with service members in Afghanistan at Bagram Air Field, Feb. 1. The 85th Med. Det. (COSC) from Fort Hood, Texas, assumes the various 219th missions at the transfer of authority ceremony held here today. (DoD photo by Maj. Charles Patterson, Task Force MED-A Public Affairs/Released)

The videos below are quite different. One is about an explosive detector dog who is charged to sniff out the explosives and keep our Soldiers alive.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S6Zi_D6w79s[/youtube]

The military has different methods to search out and destroy IEDs before they injure our troops on the ground. Army Sergeant David Birchfield tells us about one group who find IEDs by sniffing for them.

The other video depicts a mission just as important. Major Butch’s mission is to provide relief from the stresses of war. She is in Afghanistan to make our troops smile.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gs0uiV9iQu8[/youtube]

Meet “Major Butch.” Her mission is to relieve combat stress.

Two types of dogs with two separate missions.  Both with the same effect- taking care of our deployed troops in harms way. 

Heby, an Explosive Detection Dog, positively identifies an explosive

Heby, an Explosive Detection Dog, positively identifies an explosive during a training exercise at Camp Nathan Smith, Afghanistan, Jan 10. Heby is trained by Master at Arms 2nd Class Nicholas Whisker.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

 And the rest of the story…….

Pat Barter just informed me that Major Butch” was born at the “Guide Dog Foundation” in Smithtown, NY and came our of their “Vet Dog” program…She just returned home today. (7 Feb 13).

Now that is a coincidence huh!

Welcome Home Major Butch! Got get yourself some R & R!

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So I finished the first draft of my second novel last Friday. It needs major work but what first draft doesn’t?

I’m taking a break from the book to let things percolate and will start the first round of edits on Monday. I’m excited to get to work and start refining and adding richness to the novel!

For me, the first draft is a great base to work from. It is nowhere close to being ready to send to a publisher or for you to read. That may sound crazy that it took five months for me to finish a novel that isn’t even close to being ready for prime time. But it’s true………   

I’ll get it there though!

This week I spent my writing time connecting with handlers and writing posts for the website.

 

I also want to thank Meredith Towbin for nominating me for The Very Inspiring Blogger Award. I am honored. Thank you Merideth.

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Did you see my post on Facebook about the Military Working Dog Team Monument going on a national tour!

It is heading to Washington DC this summer and I plan on being there! I hope you can join me.

I will post periodic updates on the tour date. Come see the fabulous bronze statutes of these fabulous Canine Members of the Armed Service before they are memorialized forever at the National Monument in Texas.

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3 Military Working Dogs in an ATV

Top Military Dog Pictures of the Year

 So this week is my anniversary on one year since I launched this www.khanrahan.com. It has been a crazy year and I’ve learned a ton.

untitledI’ve also had the opportunity to connect with some fabulous people- thank you.

On Thursday (the actually one anniversary) there will some new designs to the site. The sliders on the entry page to the site will be new and will rotate adding a fresh new look to the site.

U.S. Air Force Military Working Dog Suk waits to begin a day of training and patroling at Cannon Air Force Base, N.M., Aug. 15, 2012. Military Working Dogs are commonly used for detecting narcotics, explosives and other harmful materials.My goal is to make the dog team stories easier to find and navigate. So you can read one story from start to finish (or were we are in the story).

Marine kissing dogI’ll also add other storylines such as my journey from the idea of writing a book to becoming an agented author. (Hopefully this year I will become an author with a publishing contract)

Pic of Soldiers and their dogs crossing an irrigation ditchTo celebrate I’m posting some of your favorite pictures of the year. To include everyone’s favorite A-team at the top of this post!

Laying down

February is going to be a great month with a Marc, Anax and Dark- will Marc and Dark be successful during their second certification?

I also have the child of war, Danica’s journey from Bosnia-Herzegovina to Afghanistan where she pairs with a viscous and “untrainable” working dog!

U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Brandon Mann, a dog handler with Alpha Company, 1st Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, and native of Arlington, Texas, sights in with his infantry automatic rifle while providing security with Ty, an improvised explosive device detection dog, during a patrol here, Feb. 16. Marines and sailors with 1st LAR and India Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, conducted clearing and disrupting operations in and around the villages of Sre Kala and Paygel during Operation Highland Thunder. Marines with 1st LAR led the operation on foot, sweeping for enemy weapons and drug caches through 324 square kilometers of rough, previously unoccupied desert and marshland terrain. Mobile units with1st LAR set up blocking positions and vehicle check points while India Company, 3/3 conducted helicopter inserts to disrupt insurgent freedom of movement.

U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Brandon Mann, a dog handler with Alpha Company, 1st Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, and native of Arlington, Texas, sights in with his infantry automatic rifle while providing security with Ty, an improvised explosive device detection dog, during a patrol here, Feb. 16. Marines and sailors with 1st LAR and India Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, conducted clearing and disrupting operations in and around the villages of Sre Kala and Paygel during Operation Highland Thunder. Marines with 1st LAR led the operation on foot, sweeping for enemy weapons and drug caches through 324 square kilometers of rough, previously unoccupied desert and marshland terrain. Mobile units with1st LAR set up blocking positions and vehicle check points while India Company, 3/3 conducted helicopter inserts to disrupt insurgent freedom of movement.

On Thursday I have a fun post to celebrate the one year anniversary of the launch of www.khanrahan.com so stay tuned. Thanks for all your support and words of encouragement!

 

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Iian, 8th Security Forces Squadron military working dog

Military Working Dogs Deserve a Snow Day

Staff Sgt. Mark Bush, 8th Security Forces Squadron military working dog handler, takes a break from validation training with Iian, 8th SFS military working dog, at Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, Jan. 4, 2012. The Wolf Pack enjoyed their first snow day of the year. (Photo by Senior Airman Brittany Auld)

Do you ever just need a snow day?

I know I do!

It looks like our Military Working Dogs are no different!

Iian, 8th SFS military working dog

Staff Sgt. Mark Bush, 8th Security Forces Squadron military working dog handler, takes a break from validation training with Iian, 8th SFS military working dog, at Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, Jan. 4, 2012. The Wolf Pack enjoyed their first snow day of the year.

U.S. Army Pfc. Justin Walker, a dog handler,

U.S. Army Pfc. Justin Walker, a dog handler, plays with his dog on Combat Out Post Baraki-Barak, Jan. 5, 2013, Logar province, Afghanistan. Walker is assigned to the 1st Squadron, 91st Cavalry Regiment, 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Alexandra Campo/Released)

U.S. Army Pfc. Justin Walker, a dog handler,

 

BAGRAM AIRFIELD, Afghanistan – U.S. Army Sgt. Garrett Grenier, a dog handler, and U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Drake, a mine-detection dog, conduct training at Bagram

BAGRAM AIRFIELD, Afghanistan – U.S. Army Sgt. Garrett Grenier, a dog handler, and U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Drake, a mine-detection dog, conduct training at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, Jan. 8, 2013. Grenier and Drake are both members of the 49th Engineer Detachment (mine dogs), and train on a regular basis with real explosives in order to sharpen Drake’s detection skills. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Christopher Bonebrake, 115th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment

BAGRAM AIRFIELD, Afghanistan –U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Allen, a mine-detection dog, and U.S. Army Sgt. Brian Curd, a mine-detection dog handler

BAGRAM AIRFIELD, Afghanistan –U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Allen, a mine-detection dog, and U.S. Army Sgt. Brian Curd, a mine-detection dog handler, search for “mines” during a training session at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, Jan. 8, 2013. A series of explosive materials were placed along the road to keep Allen’s skills sharp in order to better support counter-mine operations in Regional Command-East. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Christopher Bonebrake, 115th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

Did you get a change to read the latest update on the Canine Member of the Armed Service Act? If not click here.

 In case you missed or want to revisit a prior week’s military dog picture of the week. Here are the most recent links

War Zone Puppies That Will Make You Smile

Military Working Dogs Strike a Pose

The British Army in Afghanistan Goes to the Dogs

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Soldier find a puppy in Afghanistan

War Zone Puppies That Will Make You Smile

An Afghan and coalition force arrested a Taliban leader in Narh-e Saraj district, Helmand province, Dec. 24, 2012. The detained Taliban leader coordinated direct fire and improvised explosive device attacks against Afghanistan officials. (DoD photo by U.S. Army Spc. Matthew Hulett)

I saw the above picture the other day and immediately smiled! Here are a few more that will warm your heat. 121224-KM292-A-003

An Afghan and coalition security force arrested a Taliban leader in Nahr-e Saraj district, Helmand province, Dec. 24, 2012. The detained Taliban leader coordinated direct fire and improvised explosive device attacks against Afghan and coalition forces. He directed the assassinations of Government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan officals. (DoD photo by U.S. Army Spc. Matthew Hulett)U.S. Army Spc. Tommie Collier, from San Antonio, Texas, a veterinarian specialist assigned to the 72nd Medical Detachment, holds a puppy he found behind a school in Jalrez, Afghanistan, while Kirby, a military working dog licks the puppy's face during an Afghan Medical Personnel Skills Improvement Mission, Nov. 11. Collier is working in support of special operations in Afghanistan.

U.S. Army Spc. Tommie Collier, from San Antonio, Texas, a veterinarian  specialist assigned to the 72nd Medical Detachment, holds a puppy  he found behind a school in Jalrez, Afghanistan, while Kirby, a military working  dog licks the puppy’s face during an Afghan  Medical Personnel Skills Improvement Mission, Nov. 11. Collier is working in  support of special operations in AfghanistanClarksville, Tenn. native, Sgt. Steven Olesen, and Spc. Bryce Wiltermood, a native of Sacramento, Calif., both with the personal security detachment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), pose for a picture with a puppy at Joint Security Station Ghazaliyah 1, Feb. 24. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. James P. Hunter, 2nd BCT PAO, 101st Abn. Div., MND-B)Clarksville, Tenn. native, Sgt. Steven Olesen, and Spc. Bryce Wiltermood, a native of Sacramento, Calif., both with the personal security detachment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), pose for a picture with a puppy at Joint Security Station Ghazaliyah 1, Feb. 24. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. James P. Hunter, 2nd BCT PAO, 101st Abn. Div., MND-B)

In case you missed or want to revisit a prior week’s military dog picture of the week. Here are the most recent links

Military Working Dogs Strike a Pose

The British Army in Afghanistan Goes to the Dogs

The Puppy Program

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SGT Daniels and MWD Aura N679 Dec 3

Military Working Dogs Strike a Pose

SGT Daniels and MWD Aura N679 Dec 3.

MWD Tesa P800

MWD Tesa P800

Last March I visited the Department of Defense’s Inter-Service Advanced Skills K-9 (IASK) Course at Yuma Proving Grounds, Yuma Arizona. During the visit I met April McCoy, wife or Army Staff Sergeant Lee McCoy. Lee is an instructor at the course and you can see him in action in this photo.

SGT Lewis and MWD Lexi T306

SGT Lewis and MWD Lexi T306

April takes terrific photos of the military working dog team training and granted me permission to share her photos on my site.

Thanks April!

MWD Rocki M469, The Supervisor!

MWD Rocki M469, The Supervisor!

All the photos from today’s post are by April McCoy and used with permission.

If you want to see some more pictures from Yuma here are some great ones I took last March.

LCPL Thoryk and SSD Quill T300

LCPL Thoryk and SSD Quill T300

In case you missed or want to revisit a prior week’s military dog picture of the week. Here are the most recent links

The British Army in Afghanistan Goes to the Dogs

The Puppy Program

Search and Rescue Dogs 

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Military working dogs, these special pooches need extra care, like this dog had on patrol (Photo by Jamie Peters 26 Oct 12. Used with permission)

The British Army in Afghanistan Goes to the Dogs

Military working dogs, these special pooches need extra care, like this dog had on patrol (Photo by Jamie Peters 26 Oct 12. Used with permission)

Recently I linked up with a couple of British Army combat camera team currently deployed to Helmand Province, Afghanistan. They were kind enough to permit me to use their photos.

I don't think the dog was as keen as the military vet to do some training. (Photo by Jamie Peters 12 Dec 12. Used with permission)

I don’t think the dog was as keen as the military vet to do some training. (Photo by Jamie Peters 12 Dec 12. Used with permission)

The comments below the photos are from the photographer. Just a little taste of the “King’s English” for you all today.

I borrowed the below information about the British Army in Afghanistan from Wikipedia .

Another MWD. They really do anything their handlers do include climbing ladders Afghanistan. (Photo by Jamie Peters 10 Dec 12 Used with permission)

Another MWD. They really do anything their handlers do include climbing ladders Afghanistan. (Photo by Jamie Peters 10 Dec 12 Used with permission)

The United Kingdom was one of the first countries which took part in Operation Enduring Freedom to topple the Taliban regime in autumn 2001.

Military Working Dog Who's a Good Boy Then!!!! (Photo by Mike Hubbard 4 Dec 12.  Used with permission)

Military Working Dog Who’s a Good Boy Then!!!! (Photo by Mike Hubbard 4 Dec 12. Used with permission)

As of 11 November 2012 there have been a total of 438 fatalities of British Forces personnel including MoD civilians. The vast majority of fatalities have taken place since the redeployment of British forces to the Taliban stronghold of Helmand province, as prior to deployment in this area only five men died between April 2002 and early March 2006.

Being a British Army working dog is hard work! This little chap is getting some rest! (Photo by Mike Hubbard 11 Dec 12.)

Being a British Army working dog is hard work! This little chap is getting some rest! (Photo by Mike Hubbard 11 Dec 12.)

In all, 395 of the fatalities are classed as killed “as a result of hostile action” and 43 are known to have died either as a result of illness, non-combat injuries or accidents, or have not yet officially been assigned a cause of death pending the outcome of an investigation. The Army has seen the heaviest losses, with 351 fatalities as of 11 November 2012. Typically those killed were aged between 20 and 29 and the biggest losses seen in 2009 and 2010. Of those killed, 434 were male and three were female.

Want more of our British Army 4-legged troopers. Click Here.

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