Female Marines

Reasons Why Women Shouldn’t Be in Combat Units

Note: This post is a follow up to my post “Women Shouldn’t be in Combat Units.” You might want to read that before reading this post.

“A woman’s motherly instincts won’t allow them to kill.”

“A woman’s place is in the home taking care of the kids.”

Oh, wow, you should see all the hate messages and tweets I received on my post about women in combat units. Of course I respect everyone’s opinion. The ability to voice one’s opinion is one of the many wonderful freedoms we have in our nation. Above are just a couple of the comments I received in response to my post and I’m going to take them seriously in this post. But first I’m going to have a little fun with them.

I’m going to reflect on the classic Saturday Night Live skit with Seth Myers and Amy Poehler,  the skit titled “REALLY?” during the Weekend Update skits.

“A woman’s motherly instincts won’t allow them to kill.”

Really?”

When I first posted my women in combat piece to my facebook page , Richard Deggans, the Secretary and Web Master for the Military Working Dog Teams National Monument, kindly posted a link to an after-action review of the enemy ambush involving Sgt. Leigh Ann Hester’s patrol.  For the full news article go to this link at ABC News Report. Below is one quote from the ABC News Report:Army Sergeant Leigh Ann Hester Silver Star

“When we first started taking fire, I just looked to the right and saw seven or eight guys shooting back at us — muzzle flashes…At first, I shot one guy. I saw him fall.” – Sgt. Leigh Ann Hester, 617th Military Police Company, Baghdad , 2005

After you’ve read the after-action review you tell me if Sgt. Leigh Ann Hester or SPC Ashley Pullen’s “motherly” instincts prevented them from doing what they had to do to survive. Motherly instincts mean nothing when your survival instincts kick in. Sgt. Hester was awarded a Silver Star, our nation’s third highest award for valor.

I’ve seen my female soldiers from the 127th Military Police Company heroically fighting the enemy. Hell, I nominated one of my women platoon leaders, 1st Lt. Tristan Vasquez, for a bronze star with valor that she received from the Commanding General.

Have you ever dealt with the scorn of a woman? How about the scorn of your mother, wife or sister? If so, magnify that to infinity when dealing with a pissed off woman fighting for her life.

Okay, on to the next:

“A woman’s place is in the home taking care of the kids.”

Really? No, seriously, Really?”

Hey, male chauvinists, get over yourselves We aren’t locked in an episode of Archie Bunker! Do I really even have to address this comment? All right fine—I will, but first:

A quick and funny story: It was 1998 and I was an Army second lieutenant at Fort Bragg, North Carolina when I received a report about a soldier who had cock roaches in his government quarters. So I went there with my platoon sergeant and a squad leader, not knowing what to expect.

We entered the house to find it covered in cockroaches. Picked up the crib mattress . . . bang cockroaches. Opened the cabinet filled with baby bottles . . . cockroaches scramble. They were on the walls, closets and crawling in the refrigerator.  I had lived with cockroaches for three years at my fraternity house at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, so I was ordinarily a bit numb to these creatures. But these bastards wouldn’t run away. They stared you down as if saying, “This is my turf. Take a hike, pal!”

So I talk to the young soldier and came to find out his wife had pretty much stopped cleaning and he refused to clean.

“Why won’t you clean, Specialist Smith,” I asked him.

“That is woman’s work,” he replied staring me dead in the eyes.

I paused for a minute to see if he was joking around.

He wasn’t, so I asked, “What is up with your wife, man? Why won’t she clean?”

“She’s pissed because I won’t let her get a job.”

“Her having a job makes sense to me. You know it would help, especially with having three young kids.”

“Sir, my job is to provide. Her job is to take care of the kids and the house.”

I was speechless. I mean, how the heck do you respond to something like that?  That is sort of how I feel now about the women in combat unit topic. It is irrelevant because we are so past that as a military.

Women make up nearly 20% of the Armed Service. We couldn’t fight or function without women in our ranks. We are so past the point of the whole “role of woman” that I’m going to drop it. But really dude?

WOW, I’m nearing 800 words for this post. All right, next time I’ll talk about the other hate notes and theories of why woman shouldn’t be in combat units—like women can’t handle the emotional stress of combat. Seriously there are people that believe this! Really?

So who still thinks that women’s motherly instincts will stop them from killing in combat?

Why?

Does anyone have any examples to share of good or bad experiences with women service members during enemy contact?

Part III of this series is at the link below:

Here are More Reasons Why Women Have no Place in Combat Units

Every wonder how an Iraqi veteran felt about our withdrawal? Here are my thoughts.

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71 thoughts on “Reasons Why Women Shouldn’t Be in Combat Units

    1. Kevin Hanrahan

      TY Virginia. I am going to write the next part of this over the wknd.

      Thanks for setting me straight with my A & E……. never tweet before drinking coffee!

      Reply
  1. Sarah, the Webbiegrrl Writer

    Great post, Kevin. You had me LOL. That cockroach story is just…too real to be faked. Some guys are so stuck inside the old paradigms they literally cannot fathom what’s wrong with this picture. These are the same guys who don’t view women as people but as women–females who hold some role in life ONLY as it relates to the role of males because, of course, males are the center of the unvierse. It’s not quite mysoginistic thinking, but is to mysoginistic thinking what comments like “some of my best friends are [racist identification goes here]” is to bigotry. Covert–so covert the perpetrator actually is oblivious to his own bias.

    Thanks again for the laughs and thoughtful discussion. And REALLY, women can and do kill. Female serial killers fascinate us so much because they are so smart and adept at killing without being caught we never hear about female serial killers. They’re out there. Women set on a mission to kill can definitely make men pale by comparison. We are not as emotional creatures as men but we are more passionate. We take our killing very seriously ;-) I’m half joking, but only half (haha) Oh and *I’M* basically a passivist, one of those “fail to fire” types in offense but I got into lethal kill mode when attacked. I can’t imagine how violent women think when provoked *shudder* scares even me.

    -sry

    Reply
    1. Kevin Hanrahan

      I will never forget the serious look on that kids face Sarah…. I was shocked!

      You know I really wanted to make that correlation of racism and comparr it to sexism within the Armed Service and our society but just never ended up there. You are so right though…ignorance is ignorance no matter how you slice it.

      I have no doubt that when necessary, women will do whatever it takes to protect themselves and their comrades.

      Reply
      1. Rochelle

        Wow, that sounded so much like my ex- husband and a a guy that recently tried to date me. Hence the reason the ex part and tried to get a date lol. I was a police officer I have drawn my weapon, the only reason I did not have to shoot the man was he decided to comply with what he was ordered to do. I did not hesitate then, I would not hesitate again.

        Reply
      2. Jani Muhlestein

        It was the civil war and the abolition movement that started the fight to get women the vote. And it took another 60 years and a World War to do it.

        I hate the fact that we are forced to fight this war, but I do suspect it will again aid women to make steps forward in equality. Who knows, maybe we’ll get paid more equally after this. (I get paid quite well, but I’m a software engineer, which is a rather new industry, and they care more about the quality of your code. But it isn’t that way many other places.)

        Reply
  2. Mary Carver-Stiehler (Writing as Mary Moriarty

    Hey Kevin, I love your post! I think women are better represented in the armed services then we are in say Fire Departments. I had a situation that came up Monday night while in training. If you get a chance in your spare time go to my fb and click the link for my blog. I left a lot of stuff out but the gist was. I was doing everything that the guys were doing that night and getting past a lot of fears, crawling around with my air mask covered and in the dark to boot. Breathing air from my tank and trying to find a victim with my other two team members. Getting stuck 3 out 4 times, two of those times getting my self un-stuck… The last time with the help of friends when they tried to drag me because I became the victime because of my air tank was on it’s last seconds of air. I really got hung up. because of that and saying “Get me out of this , I don’t like the feeling!” I was left out of the “Class you guys did real good!” This was in front of the whole department and our class was present. My instructor was shocked as was my husband (But he said nothing) my instructor spoke up and all the Chief would say was” she knows what I said… It’s mind over matter” That’s what i titled my blog and it has stories from when i lived in Cambodia and times when “Mind over Matter” really counted.
    Anyway I had the feeling like a cornered animal .I thanked my instructor then turned to the Chief and told him in no certain terms that I could have said “@*%& it!” but I didn’t. I have overcome fears that 3 months ago I never thought I would have BUT even with each evolution I am advancing… I was livid but kept my cool and then those who knew the Chief was wrong came around me and praised me for doing things that earlier I couldn’t. At class two nights later the Chief said ” I want to say how well the class is doing compared to some of my full time men, all of you…” and he looked from me to my instructor. Nothing said but just that look.
    There were men who were present at the initial training who don’t think I should be a fire fighter, especially an interior fire fighter. They think it’s fine if I want to fetch tools and such… One made a comment and one of my classmates made a comment sticking up for me.
    Like I have said before I may be small but if push comes to shove and someone is in a building or one of my guys are in there I am going to do everything in my power or die trying to get them out like when I am part of a RIT team.
    I would also regardless of being a mother of 7 would kill if I had to. If I was in a Combat Unit, I know I would not hesitate to take out the enemy.
    Keep up the great work and for keeping us thinking!
    Mary

    Reply
    1. Kevin Hanrahan

      WOW, thanks for sharing that story with us Mary. I would have been so pissed! I would imagine the world of first responders is a testosterone driven world as well! I will def check out your post tonight when I get home.

      Reply
  3. Jen

    Though I have opted not to join our armed forces, I have no problem with women in combat roles. Men are people, women are people. Both tend to be pretty handy with a rifle. I just prefer not to get shot at myself (though I’m a nerd for reading about military working dogs).

    Really, what moved me to combat is the notion that a motherly instinct would PREVENT a woman from killing. Perhaps people aren’t familiar with the notion of the protective “mama bear”.

    Reply
    1. Kevin Hanrahan

      Hey Jen….love that “Mamma Bear’ comparison…..

      I remember when my Stella had pups….. No one was allowed near them except for me and my wife….. She became quite “bearish” with strangers!

      Reply
  4. aj Melnick

    Those hate comments make me laugh. My husband has always supported my choices, working, fighting for the underdog, (literally) etc. Those people are living in the Dark Ages. Get over it, people.

    aj

    Reply
    1. Kevin Hanrahan

      I am dumbfounded sometimes by how poeple think AJ. We are evolving as a society….move along with us or get left behind.

      Reply
    1. Kevin Hanrahan

      Thanks so much. I find what some people to believe is the truth to be so fascinating….and funny…..maybe a little sad. Have a great night.

      Reply
  5. Melissa

    When I first saw the title, I was thinking, “Oh jeez, another freakin’ (Not the word I actually used) sexist pig!”

    You surprised me. That’s an awesome piece of writing there. I get really upset when I hear comments like that because I find myself becoming one angry, little feminist these days.

    Keep up the good work and God Bless you for your service!

    Reply
    1. Kevin Hanrahan

      I was thinking about this today Melissa…. my title is sort of the first impression of the article …… you don’t know what makes up the piece until experience it by reading said article ……so…. how many folks who have actually experienced serving with woman in combat are against them doing so? If you don’t read the article do you ever give it a chance? Are women given an honest shot?

      OK, a little Friday night philosophizing but I think it is an intriguing thought.

      Reply
  6. halee

    Excellent points, Kevin. As you mentioned in your earlier post, women are already there. In my Management program, we heard from a female general who was in finance. She’s one of the first to get sent into theater, because the money has to go first. We’re past the “should they, shouldn’t they” discussion. Women are already out there and doing a fantastic job. Having grown up in a military town, I’m incredibly grateful to anyone (male or female) willing to serve our country.

    Reply
    1. Kevin Hanrahan

      I really feel the same way about service….. whoever you are….if you are willing to pick up a rifle and go into harm’s way with me then I’m thankful. Everything else is irrelevant to me. I would tell you that many folks I talk to in the military feel the same way.

      Reply
      1. Stephen H. King

        Amen to that. I was looking through my graduation year yearbook from West Point and came across a pic of a good buddy of mine. He served his country well, and is now doing fine in civilian world. He’s gay. Nobody ever asked or told while he was at the academy or during service. It’s much more of an issue for politicians than it is for those of us marching into the face of enemy fire, so to speak, as is the gender issue.

        Bottom line for an American soldier, I think: give me someone I can trust to my left, and someone else I can trust to my right, and I’m happy no matter what gender, race, age, national origin, or sexual preference they may be. There’s something about the battlefield that’s just that equalizing.

        Reply
        1. Kevin Hanrahan

          Great insight Stephen….thanks for sharing. Our politicians don’t give our service members enough credit when it comes to tolerance and evolution.
          Will/ are…. there problems/challenges in the military …sure but…. show me an organization that doesn’t have the same problems/ issues (or doesn’t hide it).

          Reply
        2. Anne Martin Fletcher

          Hi Stephen, I didn’t know you went to USMA (I see you on Rachelle’s blog). Great comparison to the LGBT issue. The same emotional appeals that protested letting women into the Service Academies are used to protest gays in the military. What, a guy might make a pass at someone? LOL. We can all handle it. On a more serious note, rape occurred in military units long before women joined. These are criminal issues, not gender issues. Sorry, I got off-topic. I love your quote that the battlefield is equalizing.

          Reply
  7. Angela Britnell

    Fascinating post Kevin (and your earlier one). I’m encouraged to see how things have moved on since I was in the Royal Navy 30 years ago. The only time we were allowed on a ship was as ‘window-dressing’ for a party! Keep up the good work informing the civilian world the reality of military life today.

    Reply
    1. Kevin Hanrahan

      Thanks Angela….. it will take time but we as a society have moved on….it takes some folks in positions of power longer to realize this.

      Reply
  8. Betty E. Duncan

    The Title is brilliant, i.e., women will read it to tell you how very wrong you are. Some men will read it to agree with you. What is great about the article is how seductive it is in it’s ability to pull us all in only to find we were all wrong.

    Reply
  9. Marsha Prescod

    Read this, and thought of the King of Dahomey’s legendary female regiment that was active from the 17th century to the 19th century. Dahomey was a war-like, militarised kingdom, during that period.They consisted of between 4000 and 6000 women, about a third of the entire Dahomey army. Their ‘tenderhearted, female’ qualities were shown by their tendency to decapitate captives.
    French soldiers that went up against them in colonial wars, came to respect their military capabilities.
    Books like ‘The Amazons of Black Sparta’ describe the historical accounts of this regiment, whom westerners took to calling Amazons in a nod to the warrior women of ancient myth.
    And for those who think mothers wouldnt kill? As a mother I can confirm that I could kill or maim anyone who physically harmed my child, without a moment’s hesitation. And he’s now 22 and 6 foot 5…
    I think the maternal instinct, if aroused, can be lethal.

    Reply
    1. Kevin Hanrahan

      Thanks so much for the great reference Marsha…. that actually wasn’t that long ago. Any idea how we eased into this thought process that men do the fighting and providing while the women complete the domestic tasks?

      Reply
      1. Jani Muhlestein

        @Marsha. You. Totally. Rock. The 14-year-old gets defended at all costs. And she’s 5’10 and I’m 5’2. Does. Not. Matter. I could quite easily kill for her, should it be necessary. And my pink 9 mil attests to that.

        Reply
  10. yankeemom

    Having been told by many horse trainers 4 decades ago (all male at the time) that women couldn’t train horses because (1) they didn’t have the strength to handle the stallions and (2) had other monthly “female issues”, and now being the Mom of a daughter Soldier, I’ve seen times change.
    I was fortunate growing up in being allowed to let my “tomboy” flourish and went on to work with horses ~ and female trainers over the years. Got a lot of disapproving comments from friends and acquaintances along the way. I wasn’t being “feminine” enough and such rot. How would I ever find a husband? (yes, seriously.)

    If I were 40 years or so years younger, I’d want to be a Tanker. Love tanks! Not so keen on flying tho.

    Oh yes, times have changed and will continue to do so.

    Reply
    1. Kevin Hanrahan

      Interesting….. very similar to what Mary was saying about being a fire fighter.

      I think we call it evolution Debbie. Some folks just mentally evolve slower. Mark my words though….this is coming to the military…maybe not this year or next but it will come.

      Reply
      1. yankeemom

        Not only “evolution”, though that is a big part of it, but gutsy women who didn’t take “no” for an answer and the men who supported them ~ Such as one of the male trainers I apprenticed under.

        Thanks for continuing to write about this, Kevin.

        Reply
        1. Kevin Hanrahan

          Yeah your absolutely right… we need a mind shift change…. I will talk about that in a later post but thanks for mentioning it Debbie.

          Reply
  11. Ellis Vidler

    Motherly instincts won’t let a woman kill? What sort of cave do these people live in? I doubt if any instinct is stronger than a mother’s to protect her young. Believe me, women can be as fierce as men.
    Thanks again for a great article, Kevin.

    Reply
    1. Kevin Hanrahan

      Hi Ellis. I couldn’t agree more with you. My only request from folks is that if you don’t believe what I am saying come back with proof that I am wrong….. just don’t tweet or email me and how wrong I am without backing it up. Maybe there is a reason for this?

      Reply
  12. G.R. Bliss

    Fantastic articles Kevin!

    In no way do I mean this as a negative or chauvinistic manner, but I completely agree with the “mama bear” reference. And what about black widows? And why do most people tend to choose male pets when they have children in their home? And… and… and… Right? A complete list of like examples would be massive! And which gender is almost always portrayed as being most capable of a consciously nefarious existence in books, movies, television and theatre?

    I’m not saying, in any way, that women are inherently evil or even that they are more evil than men. I’m only speaking to the ignorance of a person that would even start to think that a woman wasn’t as capable as a man to function in a life or death situation. Just using a few extreme (yet common) examples to make my point.

    My opinion on the “…in the home taking care of the kids.” is pretty simple: One word – ignorance.

    Big thanks to ALL who serve!

    Again, great posts Kevin!

    Reply
    1. Kevin Hanrahan

      Thank you. I think women and men both have strengths but what I hate to see is when folks make assumption based off of gender. I think you should be judged on your own merit. I mean, look at how female cops or firefighters were (and in some cases are) treated back 20 years ago. How about corporate executives?

      I say…come on society…lets evolve please….. BTW: The military pretty much already has…time for Congress to get in touch with us service members and let us make it official.

      I have a follow up to this post coming on Friday…. I think that one is really interesting and I’ve got a funny story to tell in it!

      Reply
  13. Anne Martin Fletcher

    I’ve been polishing the manuscript for my memoir about being in the first class at the United States Air Force Academy that included women, so, as you can imagine, I’ve heard it all. The women in the military are used to being attacked by both friend and foe. As Gen Chappie James said, fighting for your country is a privilege that has to be fought for. When situations turn bad, all that matters is everyone knows their job and performs like a team. I’ve had more than one CMSgt thank me for getting a crew home safely.

    Reply
    1. Kevin Hanrahan

      Wow Anne, you are a true groundbreaker. I can only imagine the trials and tribulations you encountered when you entered the academy. I look forward to reading about them some day.

      I lost count of how many women C130 or C17 pilots that put me out of an aircraft (I mean as a paratrooper jumping from the aircraft) while stationed at Fort Bragg. Seeing a women pilot meant nothing to me…… that evolution happened because of great women like you.

      It was crazy that I started this series of posts on women in combat on my blog and then the Marine Corps announces they are sending women Lieutenants to Infantry School. They have a tough road ahead but without them and women like you…..our evolution as a society may never happen. Thank you.

      Reply
      1. Anne Martin Fletcher

        Kevin, thank you for the plug on my book title, Groundbreaker!
        I had not heard that the Marines are sending women to Infantry School. Wow, I do not envy them.
        Hint to new soldiers going through the school — try to get into a group with a female LT. Infantry School as a woman AND as an officer.They will be like beacons, drawing all the attention away from you. Oh, just look out for the collateral damage.

        Reply
        1. Kevin Hanrahan

          Awesome name Anne! I will be happy to plug it for you when it comes out!

          I just heard about it as well….the Marines…..always ahead of the pack!

          Reply
  14. Imelda Evans

    Hi Kevin

    ‘A woman’s motherly instinct won’t allow her to kill’

    Seriously? Does that person KNOW any mothers? I hope I never have to kill anyone. I honour both the men and women who serve their countries to take those responsibilities for me.

    But seriously? Before I had a child, I doubt I could have even seriously hurt someone, deliberately. But you threaten my child? I will take you down without a moment’s pause. And I’m sure the comradeship of arms works in a similar way.

    Like I said – does he KNOW any mothers?

    Reply
    1. Kevin Hanrahan

      Of course this comment was made but a guy, Imelda. It is stereotypes like this that just need to be flushed down the toilet. It is just so silly. But I can tell you if one person believes it then there are many more- sad.

      Reply
  15. Wen Baragrey

    I just started following you on twitter and when I saw the link to this post and the title, I thought, “Whaaat? Lost me with the very first tweet!” I am SO glad I decided to read this properly before I decided that. It would have definitely been my loss if I hadn’t! Admittedly, I read it so I could properly fuel my righteous indignation, and now I feel like an idiot :)

    My daughter and I spend all our days looking after her two boys, one of whom is chronically ill. What I know for absolute sure is that if either of those boys (and in my case, my daughter) were to be threatened, you’d see killer instincts a raging rhino would be proud of.

    Clearly, those who think women’s motherly instincts won’t allow them to kill have never really made a mother angry :)

    Reply
    1. Kevin Hanrahan

      Thank you Wen. My point with the title- Don’t judge a book by it’s cover. Female service members have earned the right to be treated as equals. It won’t happen overnight. Change never does. But it is important that those with experience share the truth.

      Reply
  16. M.K.

    I’ve never served in a combat zone, or at all, and I truly appreciate the men and women who have and continue to do so, but I do live in the hood. The neighborhood’s improved but I’ve seen muzzle fire from my front porch and never get firecrackers and gunfire confused anymore. Again, things are more quiet now but when I was 9 months pregnant I awoke to the sound of multiple gun shots that was increasingly getting louder, believing me to feel that it was getting closer and quickly. (By the way, this all took place in a matter of seconds or appromately one clip from a 9mm being unloaded with some return fire inbetween) I opened my eyes, quickly rolled over grabbed a hold of my fiancé and rolled him off of the bed to the ground with myself and HUGE belly on top. He woke up and all I said was, “Stay down!” I quickly explained to him what we were hearing. But, he thought it was someone banging on the door and got up, completely against my wishes. Luckily we weren’t injured and neither was my neighbor’s son, whose car was completely riddled with bullet holes that we noticed in the morning (including his tires, engine block, and windshield which were completely shot out). Anyway, lol sorry, long time to get here, but my natural instinct was to protect the person closest to me by any means possible. No training, but simple instinct and no conscious thought went into my actions that night. So, if my actions are an example of a woman’s instinct, I’d be impressed to see what U.S. military training combined with that create, and I completely support someone like that having my cousin Rob’s back (U.S. Army) anyday.

    Reply
    1. Kevin Hanrahan

      Very cool story M.K. I’ve only worried about one neighborhood I lived in. I got a second dog and let Sammy roam the house at night. To this day I know he slept on the couch but I still can’t prove it! He is a sneaky one!

      It sounds like your survival instincts took over. I don’t think those instincts are limited to just men……obviously not!

      Reply
  17. M.K.

    Lol we did the same thing! Now we have two very loud, but sweet, dogs. Don’t tell anyone about the sweet part though ; ). Thanks for the response and your service.

    Reply
  18. Ali Geiger

    I have to disagree on a woman just protecting her children. I am a teenager and I am not a mother at all, thank God! But if I did have any children, I definitely would relentlessly attempt to kill any attacker(s) of my children. But I would also do it for an innocent bystander, myself, my friend, cousin, mother, father, sister, husband, etc.

    I guess the reason why I can get so passionate is because I am a natural strawberry blonde/light redhead (joke). I’m honestly not trying to brag or be arrogant, but it might be because I have been around Dobermans literally and truthfully almost my entire life, so far. From my experience, dogs and humans really can make a big influence on each other!

    I love the Archie Bunker comparison, by the way! The man who refused to let his wife get a job and refused to clean regardless of tons of cockroaches made steam blow out of my ears. Fantastic post, Kevin!

    Reply
    1. Kevin Hanrahan

      Hi Ali. We all know that comment about a woman’s motherly instincts came from a male. A male who has zero actual experience with the topic. He knows what he reads, is told to him or watches in a movie I suppose…… O- wait, that wasn’t very nice huh? No worries…I’m sure he is playing Soldier on his X-box right now and won’t read this!

      Did you know that Dobs were used extensively by Marines in the Pacific during WW II? They were outstanding scout dogs.

      AB was all about holding on to something…a way of life that he grew up with. This is no different. Change is hard and most people hate it. Folks will get over it though. Or they will get left behind.

      Reply
      1. Ali Geiger

        Actually, I did know that Maries used Dobies in WWII. I heard they were used for searching and rescuing soldiers that were still alive at Normandy Beach. I’m not sure if that is true though. There is a Doberman statue in Guam, honoring their work there. I really want to go there and get my picture taken next to the statue, sometime in my life.

        And that is true, they sure will get left behind.

        Reply
        1. Kevin Hanrahan

          Awesome Ali! I would love to check that statue out in person as well. I have only seen a picture of it.

          Reply
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  20. Julia Hugo Rachel

    I already gave my two cents on this subject in blogs following this one. However, I came across the statement below in the previous blog:

    “A woman’s motherly instincts won’t allow them to kill.”

    That statement incited me to post again. Long story short, disorderly neighbors were shooting rifles and the shots being fired wizzed at my son practicing baseball batting in our pasture. I screamed “get down, to everyone on bases, out fielding and those watching”. I picked up an aluminum bat and ran 1/2 mile towards the shooters screaming (not PG language) and swinging the said bat. I remember it was Gold.

    The shooters had ample time to take a shot at me. Instead, I caught up to them and swang hard, as they were running away. They could have killed a child by shooting 22′s in that direction. These were 7 year olds practicing; including my own son.

    Now, they had 2 rifles between them, plenty of ammo and were twice my size. I took both of them “on” (then called the Sheriff-my cousin).

    That statement:
    “A woman’s motherly instincts won’t allow them to kill” needs to be inverted to say, “A Mothers Instinct MAY allow and possibly incite them to kill”.

    What a bunch of Bull. My best bull on the ranch has better smelling excrement than that statement.

    Over & Out
    Julia

    Reply
  21. Molly

    I almost didn’t read this because of the title…pretty misleading, but I’m glad I did. It’s awesome reading someone with first hand experience debunking some of these archaic stereotypes. Next time I’m having a conversation w/someone about this topic, I will refer them to your work. Keep fighting the good fight!

    Reply
  22. Kevin

    When women have been given the chance to compete with men in boot camps they’ve overwhelmingly failed. The stats are there and they’re real. If women ever get to fight in combat it will be because it’s been forced upon us by lowering the bar for women to make feminists happy. this isn’t science fiction, it’s real. Where ever men and women serve together in the military it presents problems. Want to ruin the military? Go ahead, but I’ll never respect you for it.

    Reply
    1. Jani Muhlestein

      Kevin, women already serve in combat. This is just an acknowledgement of reality. But you do raise a valid point, that of standards and requirements. I agree with you that they should never be lowered for anybody. And I would be very upset if they were.

      Reply
  23. Timothy Pristash

    The idiots who say women can’t fight need to read about the Eastern European Front during World War II. The world’s most deadly sniper from that war was a Russian, and was a WOMAN. Also the IDF is about 45% female including their combat units and have fought very well in several wars.

    Reply
  24. Kevin Hanrahan

    Hi Kevin. Thanks for sharing your thoughts. Though I have to disagree.

    Comparing a woman and man physical is futile. I have never seen the studies you suggest exist. Please post a link so people can see for themselves.
    Here is what the Army is doing……the below is a quote by my boss’ boss:

    “We are just looking out at the future and saying that some day there are going to be knowledge, skills and attributes without respect to gender — physical attributes, personal attributes,” Gen. Robert W. Cone, commander of TRADOC, said on Tuesday.

    The BAR is not being lowered. The BAR is developing much like modern warfare is……. we as a military and a society must recognize this and adapt. Gender will cease to enter the conversation. I love this quote by General Cone.

    I’ve served alongside women in combat. I didn’t have any problems. What are these problems that women are causing? Are they really caused by a women?

    Reply
  25. Pingback: Skills not Gender are What Matter in the Military | Kevin Hanrahan

  26. Joey Tranchina

    Well written. I love the logic of taking on objections one at a time.

    As to the message, excellent but unnecessary in my case. My mom, Loretta C. Tranchina (1910-2003), was a CEO who took over the family business, a ranch and commercial dairy, then led it through the 1930s and 40s to a merger in the 1950s; after that she managed a law suit for her sisters, against a brother who thought “the boys” deserved all of the money, until (after 8 years in court) the judge called my uncle “a lying no good son-of-a-bitch,” from the bench.

    In my house when something needed to be fixed, my mother was a plumber while my father was a golfer — in fact a very good golfer — but not the person who built of fixed anything. I learned very early on that skills and the willingness to learn skills are what matter in life — not gender.

    Reply
  27. Jeff

    Well said Kevin. Women have every right to stand and fight. They love and want to defend their country just as much as any guy. During WW2 the Royal Canadian Airforce did not women in a fighting role, but what they did, in my eyes takes alot guts. Women ferried aircraft from Canada to England, a hard task in itself, but they flew unarmmed. The guns where not fitted til they got. That shows pride and love of country to me.

    Reply
    1. Kevin Hanrahan

      Thanks Jeff. I believe it is foolish to discount someone based on gender. Let their skills speak for themselves.

      Reply
  28. sally b

    You are totally awesome!
    Please come to Australia & sort out our sexist blokes here!
    My son-in-law explained to me that women couldn’t take combat roles because of their…feminine ‘equipment’ which wouldn’t be able to take being soaked in dirty water.(wading through swamps)..they’d get infections, or some such!?
    Not to be crude, but I really felt like getting him to read some stuff about what millions of women who have been genitally mutilated live with their whole lives.
    So, we’re weak because we have vaginas…end of story.
    Others just think we’re generally inferior:-(
    Love your work.

    Reply
    1. Kevin Hanrahan

      Thank you Sally. I think most countries will get to, and pass the point our country is at now. Eventually we knew the topic would come…….set the required standards and if you can meet them and are willing to live the life of a combat arms soldiers…….then go for it. :-)

      Reply

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